One foreign airline is selling tickets between two U.S. airports. What is it?

Air Canada can't sell you a ticket if you're only flying between two points in the U.S. But this airline can. Do you know it? Photo: Air Canada. 

Air Canada can't sell you a ticket if you're only flying between two points in the U.S. But this airline can. Do you know it? Photo: Air Canada. 

UPDATE: I have answered this trivia question in a different post. To my surprise, five people guessed corrected. The contest is now closed, but I have randomly selected two correct guessers to win American Airlines swag. Our winners are Townsend and Travis. Thanks everyone for participating! Stay tuned for the next contest. 

ORIGINAL POST: You probably know that foreign airlines cannot sell tickets to passengers seeking only to go from one point in the United States to another. This is why you cannot buy an Air Canada ticket between Los Angeles and New York, connecting in Toronto. 

But sometimes, airlines can apply for an exemption. One foreign airline has been given an exemption this year by the U.S. Department of Transportation, and it can sell tickets to Americans flying between two U.S. airports. The reason? The U.S. registered airline that previously served this (very obscure) route stopped flying it.

Can you guess the foreign airline? The first person to guess correctly - as long as this person lives in the U.S. - will receive an American Airlines amenity kit from me as a prize. 

I should warn you. This is an extremely difficult question. I'll be shocked if anyone can answer it. I'll give you one hint: The foreign airline you've probably never heard of has been using a 19-seat aircraft. 

If we don't get a correct answer, I'll randomly select one person to win the prize. Be sure to include your email address when you register your comment so I can contact you. 

Here's some information on U.S. cabotage law:

§ 122.165 Air cabotage.

(a) The air cabotage law (49 U.S.C. 41703) prohibits the transportation of persons, property, or mail for compensation or hire between points of the U.S. in a foreign civil aircraft. The term “foreign civil aircraft” includes all aircraft that are not of U.S. registration except those foreign-registered aircraft leased or chartered to a U.S. air carrier and operated under the authority of regulations issued by the Department of Transportation, as provided for in 14 CFR 121.153, and those aircraft used exclusively in the service of any government.


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