US Airways plans to retire Boeing 767-200 fleet in February

US Airways plans to retire its Boeing 767-200 fleet next month. Some of the aircraft originally flew for Piedmont Airlines. Notice the titles above? Photo: Aero Icarus, via Flickr.

US Airways plans to retire its Boeing 767-200 fleet next month. Some of the aircraft originally flew for Piedmont Airlines. Notice the titles above? Photo: Aero Icarus, via Flickr.

Cue the sentimental music: Another U.S. airlines is about to retire an aircraft that was cutting edge during the 1980s. 

This time it's US Airways, which is now scheduled to operate its final Boeing 767-200ER flight on Feb. 11, according to airlineroute.net. That's subject to change, of course. And with fuel prices so low, maybe it would be worth it to fly this gas guzzler for a few more weeks. 

Airline employees tend to get wistful during these retirements and sometimes airlines make a big deal out of them. For people who care a lot about aviation, this is sort of like when a journeyman baseball player retires. The player may not have been your hero, but you grew up with him. 

I'm confident, however, that passengers won't mind this retirement. US Airways has only five Boeing 767s, and they're not in great shape, at least in the passenger cabin. While these aircraft once were the backbone of the Europe network, they're now generally flying leisure routes within North America. Some of the final routes include Charlotte to St. Thomas, Charlotte to Orlando and Charlotte to Cancun. (One of the aircraft that recently flew to Cancun, N250AY, was originally delivered to Piedmont Airlines in 1988.)

An interior shot, taken about three years ago, of a US Airways 767s. Notice the movie screens and overhead bins? Photo: Aero Icarus, via Flickr.

An interior shot, taken about three years ago, of a US Airways 767s. Notice the movie screens and overhead bins? Photo: Aero Icarus, via Flickr.

After the retirement, I don't think you'll be seeing any more 767-200s regularly flying for North American passenger airlines. Several airlines, however, including American, Delta and United operated the newer models, the 767-300 and 767-400. 

Are you sad to see the 767-200 go?