How will airlines replace the Boeing 757?

U.S. airlines need to figure out how they'll replace the Boeing 757. Photo: Delta Air Lines. 

U.S. airlines need to figure out how they'll replace the Boeing 757. Photo: Delta Air Lines. 

How will U.S. airlines replace the Boeing 757?

If you follow aviation closely, you know Boeing stopped making the 757 in 2005, and there is no other new aircraft like it. The Boeing 737-900 and Airbus A321 have similar seat counts, but they lack the 757s range or power. An American Airlines pilot recently told me that the 757 is considered a 'sports car airplane' because of its power. It can handle long routes and take off from high altitude airports and airports with short runways. 

On some winter weeks, including this one, many 737s have to make a fuel stop when flying between New York and Boston and California. And unlike the 757s, the 737s and A321s don't really have the range to fly across the Atlantic.  

Airbus is considering building a new long-range A321 that can handle many of the 757s missions. Boeing, however, is not yet considering such an aircraft. 

This is all not new news. But I analyzed the situation this week for Aviation Week. And since this story ended up on the free Aviation Week website, I thought you all might be interested in learning a bit about the subject.  Please check out the link. 

Here's one quote you may find interesting. 

"The 757 is just a phenomenal airplane,” Fern Fernandez, American’s vice president of marketing, told me last month. “We are looking at Boeing and Airbus to deliver an airplane that replaces the 757. We really haven’t seen an airplane from either of the manufacturers with the range the 757 has. We are eagerly awaiting a solution.”