Aviation Links: What you may have missed from the weekend's news


You will never again be able to fly on an MD-11 passenger jet. Does it matter? Probably not. Photo: Wikimedia commons. 

You will never again be able to fly on an MD-11 passenger jet. Does it matter? Probably not. Photo: Wikimedia commons. 

Good morning, everyone. I was following the weekend's airline news so you did not have to. If you took a break from airline intel, here's what you may have missed. 

The last-ever MD-11 passenger flight was Sunday: Flight 672 from Montreal to Amsterdam on KLM. "[It] .... brings an end to the aircraft's nearly two-and-half-decade run of flying passengers for the world's airlines," Ben Mutzabaugh writes on Today in the Sky.  "The MD-11 first flew for a passenger airline on Dec. 20, 1990, debuting with Finnair on a flight from Helsinki to Las Palmas in the Canary Islands."

Related: Brett Snyder writes that McDonnell Douglas was lazy in creating the MD-11. Hence why the company doesn't really exist anymore. Cranky Flier. 

JetBlue is taking its premium class wines seriously. Forbes does a Q & A with the airline's new wine expert. 

It seems 102 Air India pilots were flying with lapsed licenses. All were widebody Boeing pilots. Times of India. 

Britain's Monarch Airlines is getting a £100 million cash infusion, but the carrier is still in dire shape. There will be layoffs. Existing staff could see pay cut by 30%. The number of aircraft will drop from 42 to 34. Daily Mail. 

The Los Angeles Times interviews a recently retired flight attendant who started at Pacific Southwest Airlines in 1967. She moved onto what is now US Airways when it purchased PSA. Obviously a lot changed in her career. 

The local newspaper in Springfield, Mo. wrote an astonishingly long story about a United Express aircraft operated by ExpressJet that lost cabin pressure. "If cabin pressure drops too low, there isn't enough oxygen per cubic foot in the cabin and anyone aboard will lose consciousness," the reporter explains. I doubt this emergency was as serious as it was described. But I suppose you never know.